Frequently Asked Questions

What is Insight House?

Insight House is one of the largest and most-recognized substance abuse treatment facilities in Central New York. For over 40 years, Insight House has provided professional, confidential, drug and alcohol treatment services to individuals and their families. Insight House is a not-for-profit agency serving over 600 clients per month with its outpatient and residential programs. Additionally, the agency reaches thousands of adolescents and adults in the community on an annual basis through its education and prevention programs.

My child or spouse has a drug or alcohol problem, what can I do?

Concerned family members may call Insight House directly at (315)724-5168 between the hours of 8:30 AM and 4:00 PM to obtain information. Insight House also conducts a Family Support Group meeting on Tuesday evenings from 6:15 PM to 7:30 PM, at the Insight House main office located at 500 Whitesboro Street in Utica. The Family Support Group is free of charge and open to anyone who is concerned about a loved one’s relationship with alcohol or other substances. There are no prerequisites or reservations required to attend the group and it is appropriate for individuals who may or may not have a family member in treatment. The sessions will discuss the wide range of community resources and support options available, including available adolescent programs and Al-Anon.

What does Insight House charge for services? Does Insight House accept my insurance?

Insight House Chemical Dependency Services, Inc. is a private, not-for-profit corporation which receives state funding. Our fee for an evaluation / assessment is $120, and two visits are usually required to complete the evaluation. Because Insight House is state-funded, we do not require the evaluation to be paid in advance or in full during the process. Insight House will work with individuals by assessing a self-pay rate until the person’s insurance or Medicaid is active. Individuals will not be denied treatment due to an inability to pay.

Insight House accepts most private insurances, HMO’s, Medicaid, major credit cards, or a self-pay fee can be determined by sliding fee scale. For Residential Treatment services, Congregate Care or self-pay, not Medicaid, will cover the cost for eligible individuals.

What kind of drug screening does Insight House perform?

Insight House utilizes an in-house test, BioTech, whereby test results are immediate and are used for clinical determinations. Urine screens are also sent to Medlab laboratories for testing. All urine screens are witnessed by a laboratory technician. Substances tested for include amphetamines, marijuana, cocaine, opiates, benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Insight House also does breathalyzer testing on a random basis. We do not provide blood or hair testing.

Does Insight House have a methadone program?

No, we do not have a methadone program. We do refer individuals seeking methadone treatment to Crouse Irving Hospital in Syracuse, NY.

What is the youngest age someone can be to receive services at Insight House?

There is no specific age limit specified. Insight House offers both treatment and prevention services to children. We provide intensive services to teens and have serviced children in treatment as young as age 9. With regard to treatment services, when a child is under the age of 18, if at all possible, we require a parent or legal guardian to be involved in the child’s treatment plan.

Does Insight House provide a detoxification program?

No, we do not have a detoxification program. We do refer individuals at risk of withdrawal from substances to the Addiction Crisis Center in Utica. We also refer to programs outside of the Utica area that can provide detoxification service such as Crouse Irving Hospital, Canton-Potsdam Hospital and some short-term programs such as Conifer Park and Tully Hill.

How long is a typical stay at Insight House for the inpatient residential program?

The average length of stay in the residential program is 6 months, based upon the individual’s specific needs. Successful completion of the program in not determined by the length of time the individual is in program; rather, completion is based on the patient’s ability to achieve treatment plan recommendations.

 


Frequently Asked Questions, (From National Institute on Drug Abuse)

What drugs are commonly abused?
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and other agencies monitor what drugs are being abused by tracking trends in drug abuse through many different surveys and data collection systems. Annually, NIDA supports the collection of data on drug abuse patterns among secondary school students and young adults. The table below provides recent data for some commonly abused drugs among 8th, 10th, and 12th graders.

1 “Lifetime” refers to use at least once during a respondent’s lifetime. “Past year” refers to use at least once during the year preceding an individual’s response to the survey. “Past month” refers to use at least once during the 30 days preceding an individual’s response to the survey. “Daily” refers to an individual’s drug use 20 or more times in the 30 days prior to the survey, except for cigarettes, where the definition is one or more cigarettes per day in the 30 days prior to the survey.

2 For the 2010 MTF, 46,482 students in a nationally representative sample of 396 public and private schools were surveyed about lifetime, past-year, past-month, and daily use of drugs, alcohol, and cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. The latest data are on line at www.drugabuse.gov.

Monitoring the Future Study: Trends in Prevalence of Various Drugs
for 8th-Graders, 10th-Graders, and 12th-Graders

2007-2010 (in percent)*

 

8th-Graders

10th-Graders

12th-Graders

 

2007

2008

2009

2010

2007

2008

2009

2010

2007

2008

2009

2010

Any Illicit Drug Use

Lifetime
Year
Month

[19.0]
[13.2]
7.4

19.6
14.1
7.6

19.9
14.5
8.1

21.4
[16.0]
[9.5]

35.6
28.1
16.9

34.1
26.9
15.8

36.0
29.4
17.8

37.0
30.2
18.5

46.8
35.9
21.9

47.4
36.6
22.3

46.7
36.5
23.3

48.2
38.3
23.8

Marijuana/Hashish

Lifetime
Year
Month
Daily

14.2
[10.3]
5.7
0.8

 14.6
10.9
5.8
0.9

15.7
11.8
6.5
1.0

17.3
[13.7]
[8.0]
[1.2]

31.0
24.6
14.2
2.8

29.9
23.9
13.8
2.7

32.3
26.7
15.9
2.8

33.4
27.5
16.7
[3.3]

41.8
31.7
18.8
5.1

42.6
32.4
19.4
5.4

42.0
32.8
20.6
5.2

43.8
34.8
21.4
[6.1]

Inhalants

Lifetime
Year
Month

15.6
8.3
3.9

15.7
8.9
4.1

14.9
8.1
3.8

14.5
8.1
3.6

13.6
6.6
2.5

12.8
5.9
2.1

12.3
6.1
[2.2]

12.0
5.7
2.0

10.5
3.7
1.2

9.9
3.8
1.4

9.5
3.4
1.2

9.0
3.6
1.4

Hallucinogens

Lifetime
Year
Month

3.1
1.9
1.0

3.3
2.1
0.9

3.0
1.9
0.9

3.4
2.2
1.0

6.4
4.4
1.7

5.5
3.9
1.3

6.1
4.1
1.4

6.1
4.2
1.6

  8.4
5.4
1.7

8.7
5.9
[2.2]

7.4
[4.7]
[1.6]

8.6
5.5
1.9

LSD

Lifetime
Year
Month

1.6
1.1
0.5

 1.9
1.3
0.5

1.7
1.1
0.5

1.8
1.2
0.6

  3.0
1.9
0.7

2.6
1.8
0.7

3.0
1.9
0.5

3.0
1.9
0.7

 3.4
2.1
0.6

4.0
2.7
[1.1]

3.1
[1.9]
[0.5]

4.0
[2.6]
[0.8]

Cocaine

Lifetime
Year
Month

  3.1
2.0
0.9

  3.0
1.8
0.8

2.6
1.6
0.8

2.6
1.6
0.6

  5.3
3.4
1.3

4.5
3.0
1.2

4.6
2.7
[0.9]

3.7
2.2
0.9

 7.8
5.2
[2.0]

7.2
4.4
1.9

[6.0]
[3.4]
[1.3]

5.5
2.9
1.3

Crack Cocaine

Lifetime
Year
Month

  2.1
1.3
0.6

 2.0
1.1
0.5

1.7
1.1
0.5

1.5
1.0
0.4

 2.3
1.3
[0.5]

2.0
1.3
0.5

2.1
1.2
0.4

1.8
1.0
0.5

 3.2
1.9
0.9

 2.8
[1.6]
0.8

2.4
1.3
0.6

2.4
1.4
0.7

Heroin

Lifetime
Year
Month

 1.3
0.8
0.4

  1.4
0.9
0.4

1.3
0.7
0.4

1.3
0.8
0.4

1.5
0.8
0.4

[1.2]
0.8
0.4

[1.5]
0.9
0.4

1.3
0.8
0.4

 1.5
0.9
0.4

 1.3
0.7
0.4

1.2
0.7
0.4

1.6
0.9
0.4

Tranquilizers

Lifetime
Year
Month

  3.9
2.4
1.1

3.9
2.4
1.2

3.9
2.6
1.2

4.4
2.8
1.2

  7.4
5.3
2.6

6.8
4.6
[1.9]

7.0
5.0
2.0

7.3
5.1
2.2

 9.5
6.2
2.6

8.9
6.2
2.6

9.3
6.3
2.7

8.5
5.6
2.5

Alcohol

Lifetime
Year
Month
Daily

38.9
31.8
15.9
0.6

38.9
32.1
15.9
0.7

[36.6]
30.3
14.9
[0.5]

35.8
29.3
13.8
0.5

 61.7
56.3
33.4
1.4

[58.3]
[52.5]
[28.8]
[1.0]

59.1
52.8
30.4
1.1

58.2
52.1
28.9
1.1

72.2
66.4
44.4
3.1

71.9
65.5
43.1
2.8

72.3
66.2
43.5
2.5

71.0
65.2
[41.2]
2.7

Cigarettes (any use)

Lifetime
Month
Daily

[22.1]
[7.1]
[3.0]

20.5
6.8
3.1

20.1
6.5
2.7

20.0
7.1
2.9

34.6
14.0
7.2

[31.7]
[12.3]
[5.9]

32.7
13.1
6.3

33.0
13.6
6.6

46.2
21.6
12.3

44.7
20.4
11.4

43.6
20.1
11.2

42.2
19.2
10.7

Smokeless Tobacco

Lifetime
Month
Daily

  9.1
3.2
0.8

9.8
3.5
0.8

9.6
3.7
0.8

9.9
4.1
0.9

15.1
6.1
1.6

[12.2]
5.0
1.4

[15.2]
[6.5]
[1.9]

16.8
7.5
2.5

15.1
6.6
2.8

15.6
6.5
2.7

16.3
8.4
2.9

17.6
8.5
3.1

Steroids

Lifetime
Year
Month

  1.5
0.8
0.4

1.4
0.9
0.5

1.3
0.8
0.4

1.1
[0.5]
0.3

  1.8
1.1
0.5

1.4
0.9
0.5

1.3
0.8
0.5

1.6
1.0
0.5

  2.2
1.4
1.0

2.2
1.5
1.0

2.2
1.5
1.0

2.0
1.5
1.1

MDMA

Lifetime
Year
Month

  2.3
1.5
0.6

 2.4
1.7
0.8

2.2
1.3
0.6

[3.3]
[2.4]
[1.1]

  5.2
3.5
1.2

4.3
2.9
1.1

5.5
3.7
1.3

6.4
[4.7]
[1.9]

  6.5
4.5
1.6

6.2
4.3
1.8

6.5
4.3
1.8

7.3
4.5
1.4

Methamphetamine

Lifetime
Year
Month

 [1.8]
[1.1]
0.6

2.3
1.2
0.7

[1.6]
1.0
0.5

1.8
1.2
0.7

  2.8
1.6
0.4

2.4
1.5
[0.7]

2.8
1.6
0.6

2.5
1.6
0.7

 [3.0]
[1.7]
0.6

2.8
1.2
0.6

2.4
1.2
0.5

2.3
1.0
0.5

Vicodin

 Year

  2.7

2.9

2.5

2.7

  7.2

6.7

8.1

7.7

  9.6

9.7

9.7

[8.0]

OxyContin

 Year

  1.8

2.1

2.0

2.1

  3.9

3.6

5.1

4.6

  5.2

4.7

4.9

5.1

Cough Medicine (non-prescription)

 Year

  4.0

3.6

3.8

3.2

  5.4

5.3

6.0

5.1

  5.8

5.5

5.9

6.6

Additional Trend Data for years 1995-2006.

* Data in brackets indicate statistically significant change from the previous year.

What is drug addiction?
Drug addiction is a complex brain disease. It is characterized by drug craving, seeking, and use that can persist even in the face of extremely negative consequences. Drug-seeking may become compulsive in large part as a result of the effects of prolonged drug use on brain functioning and, thus, on behavior. For many people, relapses are possible even after long periods of abstinence.

How quickly can I become addicted to a drug?
There is no easy answer to this. If and how quickly you might become addicted to a drug depends on many factors including the biology of your body. All drugs are potentially harmful and may have life-threatening consequences associated with their abuse. There are also vast differences among individuals in sensitivity to various drugs. While one person may use a drug one or many times and suffer no ill effects, another person may be particularly vulnerable and overdose with first use. There is no way of knowing in advance how someone may react.

How do I know if someone is addicted to drugs?
If a person is compulsively seeking and using a drug despite negative consequences, such as loss of job, debt, physical problems brought on by drug abuse, or family problems, then he or she probably is addicted. Seek professional help to determine if this is the case and, if so, the appropriate treatment.

What are the physical signs of abuse or addiction?
The physical signs of abuse or addiction can vary depending on the person and the drug being abused. For example, someone who abuses marijuana may have a chronic cough or worsening of asthmatic symptoms. Each drug has short-term and long-term physical effects. Stimulants like cocaine increase heart rate and blood pressure, whereas opioids like heroin may slow the heart rate and reduce respiration.

If a pregnant woman abuses drugs, does it affect the fetus?
Many substances including alcohol, nicotine, and other drugs of abuse can have negative effects on the developing fetus because they are transferred to the fetus across the placenta. For example, nicotine has been connected with premature birth and low birth weight as has the use of cocaine.

Whether a baby’s health problems, if caused by a drug, will continue as the child grows, is not always known. Research does show that children born to mothers who used marijuana regularly during pregnancy may have trouble concentrating, even when older. Our research continues to produce insights on the effects of drug abuse on the fetus.

Are there effective treatments for drug addiction?
Drug addiction can be effectively treated with behavioral-based therapies and, for addiction to some drugs such as heroin or nicotine, medications. Treatment will vary for each person depending on the type of drug(s) being used, and multiple courses of treatment may be needed to achieve success.

What is detoxification, or “detox”?
Detoxification is the process of allowing the body to rid itself of a drug while managing the symptoms of withdrawal. It is often the first step in a drug treatment program and should be followed by treatment with a behavioral-based therapy and/or a medication, if available. Detox alone with no follow-up is not treatment.

What is withdrawal? How long does it last?
Withdrawal is the variety of symptoms that occur after use of some addictive drugs is reduced or stopped. Length of withdrawal and symptoms vary with the type of drug. For example, physical symptoms of heroin withdrawal may include: restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, and cold flashes. These physical symptoms may last for several days, but the general depression, or dysphoria (opposite of euphoria) that often accompanies heroin withdrawal may last for weeks. In many cases withdrawal can be easily treated with medications to ease the symptoms, but treating withdrawal is not the same as treating addiction.